What to Do When You Hit “The Wall” in Recovery

What to Do When You Hit “The Wall” in Recovery

People who are trying to live in sobriety will hear that at some point in recovery, they will “hit the wall”. When people first begin working out, they will notice a big difference in their bodies. This is because the body is experiencing something new and is reacting to it accordingly. After a while though, they hit a plateau. It is not because they are no longer working out. It is more than the body has fully adjusted to the current workout and is ready for something new. When this happens, they have three choices: 1) give up since they no longer see results; 2) remain at that plateau thinking what they are doing is enough and never progressing; or 3) push through it by changing up the current workout. When you plateau in recovery, you are faced with the same three choices. The easiest thing would be to give up, but you did not go into this because it is easy. And yes, you can just hover where you are, but then you will never reach your goal. The best option is to push through it with everything you have inside of you. The following are some ways to help you do just that.

Remember Where You Came From

When you hit a wall, you often look around and feel you have not done enough, that you are not good enough, and that you just wasted your time because you think you are no better than when you started. That is absolutely not true. You have to remember where you came from, how low you were when you started. When you think about how you used to be, you will see the difference and that will push you to continue.

Know Your Enemy

Often, when you know something is coming, you can prepare for it. Understanding what it means to “hit the wall” in your sobriety is the first step in battling it. You do not want anything to catch you off guard that regresses your progress. Study the signs and symptoms, and talk to others who have been there to hear how it really feels. This will help you recognize what is going on before it gets too far, so if you do hit a wall, you can recognize the negative self-talk for what it is: lies.

Be Open About It

One of the worst things that you can do when suffering from any emotions or negative thoughts is to keep it to yourself. Suffering in silence is not going to help you in the recovery process. There are people who know what you are going through because they have been there, but they cannot help if you do not allow them to. Also, speaking to your therapist, counselors, and anyone else involved in your recovery about it can let them know that it is time to change up your program. Discuss these feeling with them and ask what you might do differently or in addition to your current program to stimulate your recovery once again. They, too, are committed to your success and will do what they can to help you move past this phase.

Surround Yourself with Support

There are people who love and care about you, and they want to see you succeed. If you are committed to your sobriety, they are most likely willing to do whatever it takes to support you. Also, when you do feel like you have gone nowhere, those are the people that can tell you just how far you have come. Ask them how they feel about your progress so far and you will probably find that they are proud of you. Hearing the praise can boost your self-confidence and push you toward the finish line.

Conclusion

Though hitting a wall in your recovery may seem intimidating, it does not have to be. It is completely possible to run straight through it with the right support and program. Remember why you chose to reach for sobriety in the first place and keep that goal in mind. Do not wait for help to find you. If you feel yourself struggling with your recovery, reach out to the people that can help you keep pushing and hold you up when necessary. Above all, do not give up hope.

How to Get Clean & Sober for Good

Have you recently stopped drinking, or given up your addictive behavior? Are you serious about remaining sober this time? Do you want to find a way to avoid having a relapse? The fact is, up to 90 percent of people who achieve sobriety for the long term experienced a relapse along the way. As a result, you may need some tips for recovery. After all, being informed, knowing what to expect and how to conduct yourself is the best way to continue living your new, sober lifestyle. Make Smart Changes If you want to maintain your sobriety, then it is absolutely essential you abandon your old hangouts, habits, and routines. In some cases, you may need to make other changes, too. It doesn’t matter what type of changes you make – the goal is to participate in behavior that’s different than what you did in the past. If you want to develop and keep a drug- and addiction-free lifestyle, you will know the immediate changes that need to be made. These include things like not hanging around people you got drugs from or drank with. If you want to remain sober, you can’t hang around the people you used to drink with. There are some people who have discovered it’s best to make new friends if they really want to remain sober. If you find this challenging, then consider joining a support group, or even participating in a fellowship. Another option is to try to spend more time with your family. Plan activities that everyone will enjoy and that will help your entire family live a healthier life. This can also help you avoid situations where you would be tempted to drink or do drugs. Find a Sense of Balance in Your Life A common mistake for many people who have recently become sober is substituting a brand-new compulsion or addiction for the ones they had in the past. After all, someone who has become an alcoholic or addict is typically compulsive, which can be quite dangerous and lead to a relapse. If you are new to recovery, you may find that you are compulsive when it comes to a new diet, exercise routine, or even a support group. If this is the case, you are simply substituting one addiction for a new one. Even if your new activity is productive and healthy, it can be a stumbling block that prevents you from ever fully recovering. The goal is for you to find some level of balance and to take control of everything in your life, as well as all of the choices that you make. You need to figure out that you have options and that you can maintain control of your life. If there is any part of your life that is considered out of control, then this is going to hinder your ability to continue living your new, sober life. Deal with the Mistakes You Made in the Past If you have made it to recovery, chances are you have also left quite a bit of suffering and pain behind you. There are probably many things in your past that cause feelings of guilt and shame. If you want to maintain your sobriety, there is no question that the guilt and shame may become toxic. This can result in you relapsing if you don’t properly deal with it. Shame is when you have negative believes about yourself, as well as your self-worth. Guilt is if you have any type of negative or bad feelings about your past behavior. If you are in recovery you may have shame for getting addicted to being with. The best way to deal with these feelings is by facing your past. You have to apologize to those you hurt and try to make amends. This is going to help you maintain your new-found sobriety. Living a Sober Life: It’s Possible Remaining drug and addiction free for life is your ultimate goal. If you want to achieve this goal, then you have to take control and stop living in the past. The only way to ensure you don’t repeat the behaviors of the past is to move forward and live each day in your new sober life. If you or a loved one are struggling with addiction, do NOT be afraid to reach out. Contact us today to talk to an addiction treatment professional.